The Bradbury Group News

FAQ: How is End Flare controlled in Roll Formed Profiles?

Posted by Matt Werner on Jun 18, 2020 9:21:49 AM

End flare can be inherent in roll formed parts, especially when produced on a precut roll forming line as opposed to a post cut line which forms the panel first and then shears it to length.  The amount of flare depends on the tooling design, the use of anti-flare fixtures, material type and strength, profile or a combination of these factors.  Excessive end flare in roll formed shapes can cause issues when installing and end lapping panels. Purlins used in rigid frame building structures are heavy gauge deep sections which can have more end flare.  When forming a purlin, it will naturally flare in on the leading edge and out on the trailing edge. In other words, the leg angles on the leading edge are typically over 90 degrees, while the trailing edge leg angles are under 90 degrees.  The returns lips can also have flare making it difficult when face to face welding cee sections.  Just a few degrees of end flare on an eave strut can cause a high spot in the roof panel that is fastened to this section.  

To minimize and control flare in purlins, Bradbury incorporates an anti flare fixture into the straightener at the end of the machine.  Both the drive and operator side have a three-roll configuration to independently control the flare on either side of the part.  The position of the center roll must satisfy both the leading and trailing flare. This can be a balancing act, due to a single adjustment affecting both. With that said, operators will typically find that middle ground on the center roll adjustment that adequately reduces the flare on the leading and trailing ends to within tolerance.

Servo driven auto anti flare fixtures are different to stationary anti flares on the straightener fixture.  

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Topics: Metal Building Roll Forming, Product Spotlight, Metal Roofing, Steel Framing, FAQ

FAQ: What does a Calendering machine do?

Posted by Rachel Grilliot on May 21, 2020 9:00:00 AM

Calendering:  A process that plays a part in all our lives, yet most of us have no idea what it is. From disposable diapers to dryer sheets, to disinfectant wipes, to rubber tires, to PVC films used on laminate floors, to healthcare protective equipment, and many more - calendering  is vital to the production of thousands of products used every day.  

Calendering is the process of pressing a continuous web or substrate, such as cloth, rubber, paper, film, nonwoven, composite, wire mesh, etc., between rollers to create specific physical characteristics. These can include controlled thickness, surface finish, and required properties such as structural reliability, liquid absorption, and abrasion resistance.

Alliance Machine and Engraving, LLC manufactures custom calender machines for numerous industries. The calenders employ two or more steel rolls that close under pressure to smooth, compress, and in some cases partially bond a nonwoven, plastic, paper, or another substrate. The rollers may be mirror-smooth, embossed with a pattern, or porous, and are usually heated with hot oil or electric elements. The calender machines can be utilized in an independent converting setting or an integrated production facility. Each designed with a specific application, Alliance calenders currently in use range from 260” wide to less than 12” wide.   

When processing certain webs such as fine paper or precision magnetic tapes, a calender will have a stack of rolls through which the web is threaded. This is referred to as a supercalender. 

Many nonwoven’s need to be calendered as part of their production or finishing process. The combination of heat and pressure seals and consolidates the random fibers in the web, yielding a sturdy, cost-effective replacement for woven fabrics in applications such as disposables (medical masks, dental bibs, diapers, wipes, dryers sheets), semi-durables (filters, packaging, scouring pads) and durables (automotive, home furnishings, garment bags, geotextiles).

Alliance is currently working with a major supplier of woven fabrics for various markets including healthcare. Many of their materials have a cotton and a synthetic component. The supplier wants to investigate how calendering one such blend could help reduce porosity by partially melting and sealing the surface, therefore making the material better suited for a protective garment barrier application. The supplier sent material samples to Alliance and the samples were run on a test lab calender at various speeds, temperatures, and pressures. The materials have been returned to the supplier to test results. Helping find ways to improve the material used for healthcare gear is an honor for Alliance. 

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Topics: Company News, FAQ, Alliance

FAQ: what thickness of steel can be processed on a bradbury hydraulic leveler?

Posted by Rachel Grilliot on May 10, 2019 9:15:00 AM

Bradbury's largest leveler series to date includes a heavy gauge eDrive® leveler (U.S. Patent #8893537) and production shear, capable of processing 1.0” thick by 120” wide hot rolled steel. The leveler has 8.5” diameter work rolls, two 250 Horsepower motors and can impart up to 8,200,000 lbs. of hydraulic leveling force to the material it processes. The shear is equipped with an automated cartridge blade change system which reduces the changeover time when shear blade sharpening is required. The cartridge can be extracted from the shear’s main frame in approximately three minutes. It requires the same amount of time to reinsert the cartridge making it ready for production. The heavy-duty machinery is controlled by an industrial touchscreen PC running proprietary software. The software is intuitive, allowing for saved setup parameters for future recall. 

The Bradbury Series of eDrive® levelers range from .015” (.38mm) to 1.0” (25mm) material capacity. 

When combined with the Bradbury Flat Trak® CL (U.S. Patent #7185519) and the Bradbury Bow Scout® (U.S. Patent #9021844), Bradbury eDrive® levelers offer you the most advanced leveling system in the world. 

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Topics: Leveling and Coil Processing, FAQ

FAQ: what does it take to MANUFACTURE Metal Building Panels with felt underlayment that lay flat?

Posted by Matt Werner on Apr 16, 2019 10:33:18 AM

Metal Building panels with felt underlayment applied can look just as good as panels manufactured without.  However, it does take some changes in the roll tooling design.

The demand for felt applied metal roof and wall panels is growing, typically used for controlling condensation build up or sometimes used for sound deadening applications.  Many manufacturers have tried to apply the felt on their existing panel roll forming lines and have found it can be difficult to produce a panel without major cupping.  Usually the overlap and underlap sides of the panel curl up several inches. 

Panel issues when felt underlayment is applied and formed with standard tooling

This has caused problems for panel producers with appearance and wavy panels after installation.  Manufacturers often try to raise the roll tooling to allow for the additional material thickness, which loses the effective over form needed to keep the panel within specifications.  

Bradbury High Speed Underlayment Fixture Before B.O.S.S.™ Shear

 

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Topics: Metal Building Roll Forming, Company News, FAQ

Bradbury Helps inspire Next Generation of Manufacturers

Posted by Rachel Grilliot on Oct 17, 2018 1:41:11 PM

Moundridge, KS – The Bradbury Co., Inc., serving as the world headquarters for the global group of companies known as The Bradbury Group, hosted a Manufacturing Day Open House on Thursday, October 4. According to the Manufacturing Day® website, www.mfgday.com, “Manufacturing Day® is a celebration of modern manufacturing meant to inspire the next generation of manufacturers and occurs on the first Friday in October.”

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Topics: Company News, FAQ